Friday, May 29, 2009

"Animals Today" Announcement

Program of May 31, 2009
This Sunday's 2:00-3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Savings Time segment will feature Janice Kirsh from the Humane Society of the United States to discuss their humane education program. In the broadcast's second hour, Dr. Kirshner will discuss pit bulls and update listeners on the dogs previously associated with Michael Vick. Also in the second half, Dr. Lori will be talking to author Meg Daley Olmert to discuss her book, Made for Each Other - The Biology of the Human-Animal Bond.

For more information on how you can participate in the ISAR-sponsored "Animals Today" radio show, please visit our blog ISAR and "Animals Today" Radio Show.

In case you have missed any of the "Animals Today" radio shows, previous broadcasts are now archived at the show's website: http://www.animalstodayradio.com/. At the top of the page, the link "Click here to listen" will take you to a new screen showing the dates and guests of previous shows. Click on the links to listen to a particular show.

Thursday, May 21, 2009

ISAR vs. Michael Vick

Upon dog fighting ring leader Michael Vick's recent release from prison, ISAR received an e-bulletin from The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) stating that HSUS is going to "provide an opportunity for Michael Vick to get involved in some of their anti-dog fighting outreach programs."

Lest anyone forget some of the details about dog-abuser Michael Vick's brutal conduct, we all must remember that according to a United States government report Vick found dog fighting "funny to watch" and, proving that he is no better than a savage, actually threw family pets in the ring with pit bulls and watched the trained killers injure or kill the helpless dogs-so a witness told federal investigators during the dog fighting investigation that brought Vick down and deservedly sent him to prison. That's the kind of reason ISAR has taken it upon ourselves to lead the fight against Vick profiting from the celebrity he acquired by being a savage abuser of dogs.


ISAR has since been circulating our petition "Don't Let Michael Vick Benefit By Abusing Dogs". Each time ISAR learns that Vick has, or is about to, benefit from his criminal “celebrity,” we’ll send our “Don't Let Michael Vick Benefit By Abusing Dogs” Petition to everyone who’s trying to help him. We’ll also send an email to all Petition signers informing them that we’ve done it.

Vick’s sentence, a mere two years in prison, was insufficient punishment for his savage acts. ISAR’s Petition is a grass roots effort to further punish Vick for his abominable conduct, and we vow to keep after him even after he has faded from public view (and the sooner the better).

We ask only two simple things from caring individuals and humane organizations around the world.

Please sign our Petition.

Please forward this blog containing ISAR’s Petition to everyone on your mailing list, and ask all recipients to do the same.

To deal with HSUS and their newfound relationship with notorious dog abuser Michael Vick, ISAR has first decided to contact HSUS President Wayne Pacelle with a letter questioning their latest move. You can read ISAR's letter to Mr. Pacelle below.


Dear Wayne:

ISAR, along with many others in our movement, has received your “What’s next for Michael Vick” essay. You make a persuasive argument that Vick could, and I repeat could, be a force for good regarding the obscene practice of dog fighting. ISAR’s fear, however, and that of many of our colleagues in the animal protection movement, is that the allegedly repentant Michael Vick is actually the sociopath Michael Vick who is using HSUS to further his own professional and financial goals. Is Mr. Hyde still there, behind the fa├žade of Dr. Jekyll?

You rightly raise the question of whether Vick is “serious,” and assure the animal protection movement that HSUS will “soon find out,” but you do not explain how.

Frankly, ISAR is dubious. We don’t believe that given Vick’s criminal conduct, and the lack of information (let alone evidence) to explain his apparently Leavenworth-induced epiphany, the dog abuser has suddenly become the dog lover.

Accordingly, ISAR will watch HSUS while you watch Vick.

While we hope you’re correct, ISAR will continue our petition drive seeking to prevent Vick from benefiting from the celebrity he acquired through abusing and killing animals. Just in case, and until Vick conclusively, through obvious and meaningful conduct over the long term, earns his way back from the sewer which he inhabited before his incarceration.

Sincerely,

Susan Dapsis
President

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Great Success for Animal Legal Defense Fund . . . and Hundreds of Dogs

ISAR’s friend, Joyce Tishler, lawyer and founder of Animal Legal Defense Fund, has an email out, which we’ll let speak for itself:

I’m happy to share with you that the story of Animal Legal Defense Fund v. Woodley has been reported on with great care as a
big feature story in the June issue of O, The Oprah Magazine. It’s a fantastic tribute to the huge team effort that helped secure our victory in the largest civil animal cruelty case in American history, and it tells in-depth the stories of several of the rescued dogs with their new adoptive families.

The June issue of O is now available on newsstands.
Please share these links with your friends and contacts. We’re also posting an announcement on Facebook, so be sure you are an ALDF fan on Facebook and share the story with your Facebook friends as well. Please help us get the word out about the tragedy of animal hoarding.

All the best,
Joyce


There are two important points to be made here. One is that the animal law movement is real and achieve important moral and practical goals. The other is that the achievement of those goals is now deemed news by mainstream publications, such as O, The Oprah Magazine.

Joyce Tischler and her colleagues at ALDF deserve enormous credit for this “twofer,” and for the good work, some of it unsung, they have done in all the years since this indispensable organization’s founding.

Friday, May 15, 2009

"Animals Today" Announcement

Program of May 17, 2009

This Sunday's 2:00-3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Savings Time segment will feature Patrick Ramage from International Fund for Animal Welfare to discuss whaling, the International Whaling Commission, and threats to whales, including sonar and ocean noise. In the broadcast's second hour, Dr. Kirshner will feature Dr. Ray Greek, President of Americans for Medical Advancement to discuss the use of animals in science and medical testing.

For more information on how you can participate in the ISAR-sponsored "Animals Today" radio show, please visit our blog ISAR and "Animals Today" Radio Show.

In case you have missed any of the "Animals Today" radio shows, previous broadcasts are now archived at the show's website: http://www.animalstodayradio.com/. At the top of the page, the link "Click here to listen" will take you to a new screen showing the dates and guests of previous shows. Click on the links to listen to a particular show.

Saturday, May 9, 2009

Another Milestone For Animal Rights Law

Veterans of the animal rights legal movement believe that it began back in 1972 when ISAR's chairman, Professor Henry Mark Holzer, brought a federal lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the ritual slaughter exemption to the federal Humane Methods of Livestock Slaughter Act of 1958, and expressly invoking the moral/legal concept of "animal rights"--as a result of which some graciously consider him "the first animal rights lawyer." (See http://isaronline.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Tischler_StanfordJournalVol11.pdf)

In her Stanford article, its author, Joyce Tischler, Esq., of the Animal Legal Defense Fund, credits Professor Holzer with three accomplishments crucial to establishing the field of what today is known as “animal rights law”: (1) with ISAR, having brought the first federal and first state lawsuit expressly invoking the moral /legal concept of “animal rights”; (2) with ISAR, having founded the Animal Rights Law Reporter, which became “the legal clearinghouse for animal rights law information”; and, (3) again with ISAR, having organized the “First National Conference on Animal Rights Law”—an undertaking, in Ms. Tischler’s words, “[t]he significance of which cannot be overstated.”

At that conference Professor Holzer had articulated his vision for using the law on behalf of animals.

A major result of the conference was to coalesce the attending lawyers into a loose network of like-minded individuals, and to identify the tools necessary to create an entirely new, discrete field of law--one which would take its deserved place among other long-recognized practice areas such as corporate law, property law, criminal law and many others.

Over the past two decades, that vision has been almost fully realized.

Today, courses in animal law are taught in virtually every major law school in America, usually using books expressly written for that subject.

Today, conferences are frequently held for lawyers practicing animal rights law.

Today, lawyers draft animal rights legislation, and lobby for their enactment.

Today, more than one law school has nationally recognized programs in animal law.

Today, professional journals devoted solely to animal rights law are published.

Today, animal protection lawyer testify before legislative committees.

Today, laypersons with legal issues involving animals seek out lawyers who specialize in animal protection law.

Today, articles, monographs and books on animal law issues proliferate.

Today, national animal protection organizations have lawyers on their permanent staffs.

Today, more and more college students enter law school because they want to practice animal rights law.

Today, animal rights lawyers consult with lawyers in general practice who may from time to time have a case involving animal issues.

Today, state and local bar associations have animal law sections.

Today, lawyers file "friend-of-the-court" briefs in cases involving animal protection (as Professor Holzer will soon do in the Supreme Court of the United States on ISAR's behalf in the case of United States v. Stevens, in an effort to protect the constitutionality of a federal animal protection statute.)

Today, the American Bar Association, recognizes the existence of the animal rights law practice area by maintaining a subcommittee for those interested in that subject.

Today, lawyers litigate animal rights cases in federal and state, and trial and appellate, courts throughout the United States.

And today, thanks to the ABA, lawyers who litigate those cases are going to have a much easier time--and be able to achieve even better results for their human and animal clients.

That's because of a brand new 584 page book published by the ABA this year, edited by Joan Schaffner and Julie Fershtman: Litigating Animal Law Disputes: A Complete Guide for Lawyers.

The Guide was a formidable undertaking, and its editors and contributors have discharged their task admirably, as its seventeen page Table of Contents reflects.

There, one finds every imaginable topic of interest to lawyers who act on behalf of animals and their custodians: Negligence and Tort Law; Ownership, Custody and Keeping of Animals; Veterinary Malpractice; Animal-Related Contract and Sales Disputes; The Disabled, Service Animals, and the Law; Animal Insurance Litigation; Legal Issues Involving Animal Associations and Individuals Helping Animals; Remedies in Animal-Related Litigation; Criminal Law; Expert Witnesses; Practical Considerations for Attorneys Handling Animal Law Cases.

These chapter headings only suggest at the depth and breadth of information contained in the many sections and subsections of each one, and in the appendices which accompany some of the chapters and appear at the end of the book. (The appendices are also copious indexes.)

It's evident that the editors and contributors gave considerable thought to what their book should contain and, speaking as one who was in this field from the beginning--before the beginning, according to some--they've thought of almost everything. (One suggestion for the second edition: the inclusion of a chapter on the constitutional aspects of animal law, and a Table of Cases and Other Authorities cited in the Guide.)

Litigating Animal Law Disputes: A Complete Guide for Lawyers deserves to be in the library of every lawyer and law library in the United States because it is the one-stop resource for every lawyer who contemplates acting on behalf of animals and their custodians.

Thursday, May 7, 2009

"Animals Today" Announcement

Program of May 10, 2009

This Sunday's 2:00-3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Savings Time segment will feature Dr. Elliot Katz, President of In Defense of Animals (IDA) who will discuss IDA's call on the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club to stop racing horses at the new Del Mar Race Track after seven horses died within the first few days of the track's season. In the broadcast's second hour, Dr. Kirshner will feature Author Richard Conniff to discuss his new book, "Swimming with Piranhas at Feeding Time - My Life Doing Dumb Stuff With Animals." Conniff is a well known author and humorist who has written for National Geographic, Smithsonian, and more.

For more information on how you can participate in the ISAR-sponsored "Animals Today" radio show, please visit our blog ISAR and "Animals Today" Radio Show.

In case you have missed any of the "Animals Today" radio shows, previous broadcasts are now archived at the show's website: http://www.animalstodayradio.com/shows/listen.html. At the top of the page, the link "Click here to listen" will take you to a new screen showing the dates and guests of previous shows. Click on the links to listen to a particular show.